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heartbeatofatimelord:

physcoaustin:

tardisol:

IF YOU HAD ROOM WITH ABSOLUTELY NOTHING IN IT AND THE WALLS CEILING AND FLOOR WERE MADE OF MIRROR WHAT WOULD IT LOOK LIKE IN THE MIRRORS

No.

Holy shit I asked my dad who’s a physics teacher and he just looked at me, looked at the table, looked at me, tried not to smile, looked angry, and started to look up where you can buy big mirrors.

A cube with mirrors for walls would be entirely dark inside, because it’s fully enclosed and there’s no light source (obvs). If you introduce a light source (a window or a bulb or something), there’d be reflections happening all over the place and you’d probably get some rather bright walls. That’s about it.

(Source: teenytomlin, via oswinrycbaroswald)

*1

What is a boson?

anal-muffin-explosion:

I wrote an article for my university newspaper, and y’all should go read it so it looks popular and they let me write more things.

Thnx xoxoxo

(Source: clara-always-knows)

sciencenote:

Rosalind Franklin 1920 - 1958
Rosalind Franklin always liked facts. She was logical and precise, and impatient with things that were otherwise. She decided to become a scientist when she was 15. She passed the examination for admission to Cambridge University in 1938, and it sparked a family crisis. Although her family was well-to-do and had a tradition of public service and philanthropy, her father disapproved of university education for women. He refused to pay. An aunt stepped in and said Franklin should go to school, and she would pay for it. Franklin’s mother also took her side until her father finally gave in.
…
She spent three years in France, enjoying the work atmosphere, the freedoms of peacetime, the French food and culture. But in 1950, she realized that if she wanted to make a scientific career in England, she had to go back. She was invited to King’s College in London to join a team of scientists studying living cells. The leader of the team assigned her to work on DNA with a graduate student. Franklin’s assumption was that it was her own project. The laboratory’s second-in-command, Maurice Wilkins, was on vacation at the time, and when he returned, their relationship was muddled. He assumed she was to assist his work; she assumed she’d be the only one working on DNA. They had powerful personality differences as well: Franklin direct, quick, decisive, and Wilkins shy, speculative, and passive. This would play a role in the coming years as the race unfolded to find the structure of DNA.
Franklin made marked advances in x-ray diffraction techniques with DNA. She adjusted her equipment to produce an extremely fine beam of x-rays. She extracted finer DNA fibers than ever before and arranged them in parallel bundles. And she studied the fibers’ reactions to humid conditions. All of these allowed her to discover crucial keys to DNA’s structure. Wilkins shared her data, without her knowledge, with James Watson and Francis Crick, at Cambridge University, and they pulled ahead in the race, ultimately publishing the proposed structure of DNA in March, 1953.
The strained relationship with Wilkins and other aspects of King’s College (the women scientists were not allowed to eat lunch in the common room where the men did, for example) led Franklin to seek another position. She headed her own research group at Birkbeck College in London. But the head of King’s let her go on the condition she would not work on DNA. Franklin returned to her studies of coal and also wrapped up her DNA work. She turned her attention to viruses, publishing 17 papers in five years. Her group’s findings laid the foundation for structural virology.
While on a professional visit to the United States, Franklin had episodes of pain that she soon learned were ovarian cancer. She continued working over the next two years, through three operations and experimental chemotherapy and a 10-month remission. She worked up until a few weeks before her death in 1958 at age 37.

sciencenote:

Rosalind Franklin
1920 - 1958

Rosalind Franklin always liked facts. She was logical and precise, and impatient with things that were otherwise. She decided to become a scientist when she was 15. She passed the examination for admission to Cambridge University in 1938, and it sparked a family crisis. Although her family was well-to-do and had a tradition of public service and philanthropy, her father disapproved of university education for women. He refused to pay. An aunt stepped in and said Franklin should go to school, and she would pay for it. Franklin’s mother also took her side until her father finally gave in.

She spent three years in France, enjoying the work atmosphere, the freedoms of peacetime, the French food and culture. But in 1950, she realized that if she wanted to make a scientific career in England, she had to go back. She was invited to King’s College in London to join a team of scientists studying living cells. The leader of the team assigned her to work on DNA with a graduate student. Franklin’s assumption was that it was her own project. The laboratory’s second-in-command, Maurice Wilkins, was on vacation at the time, and when he returned, their relationship was muddled. He assumed she was to assist his work; she assumed she’d be the only one working on DNA. They had powerful personality differences as well: Franklin direct, quick, decisive, and Wilkins shy, speculative, and passive. This would play a role in the coming years as the race unfolded to find the structure of DNA.

Franklin made marked advances in x-ray diffraction techniques with DNA. She adjusted her equipment to produce an extremely fine beam of x-rays. She extracted finer DNA fibers than ever before and arranged them in parallel bundles. And she studied the fibers’ reactions to humid conditions. All of these allowed her to discover crucial keys to DNA’s structure. Wilkins shared her data, without her knowledge, with James Watson and Francis Crick, at Cambridge University, and they pulled ahead in the race, ultimately publishing the proposed structure of DNA in March, 1953.

The strained relationship with Wilkins and other aspects of King’s College (the women scientists were not allowed to eat lunch in the common room where the men did, for example) led Franklin to seek another position. She headed her own research group at Birkbeck College in London. But the head of King’s let her go on the condition she would not work on DNA. Franklin returned to her studies of coal and also wrapped up her DNA work. She turned her attention to viruses, publishing 17 papers in five years. Her group’s findings laid the foundation for structural virology.

While on a professional visit to the United States, Franklin had episodes of pain that she soon learned were ovarian cancer. She continued working over the next two years, through three operations and experimental chemotherapy and a 10-month remission. She worked up until a few weeks before her death in 1958 at age 37.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

*5
How to Draw a Sierpinski Triangle
The Sierpinski triangle is an awesome fractal, built up of lots of tiny triangles and forming a cool infinitely-repeating pattern of bigger triangles. It looks deceptively complicated, but drawing your own is a simple way to pass the time in a boring maths lesson.
Draw a single small, upwards-pointing, equilateral triangle at the top centre of your page
On the next row down, draw two identical triangles touching the bottom corners of the first triangle; if you’ve done it right, these two triangles should touch at the corners
On all subsequent rows, draw a triangle with its upper point at every corner that is not already touching another triangle
Repeat step 3 until you run out of room on your paper
If you have enough paper (a single sheet of A4 is more than enough for triangles of side length 5mm), you should see something like the above starting to take shape.
If you have enough paper, you’ll notice that the pattern just keeps multiplying itself in an entirely predictable pattern, and that each subsection of the pattern looks basically the same as the overall pattern—this is what makes it a fractal.
Now go forth and Sierpinski!

How to Draw a Sierpinski Triangle

The Sierpinski triangle is an awesome fractal, built up of lots of tiny triangles and forming a cool infinitely-repeating pattern of bigger triangles. It looks deceptively complicated, but drawing your own is a simple way to pass the time in a boring maths lesson.

  1. Draw a single small, upwards-pointing, equilateral triangle at the top centre of your page
  2. On the next row down, draw two identical triangles touching the bottom corners of the first triangle; if you’ve done it right, these two triangles should touch at the corners
  3. On all subsequent rows, draw a triangle with its upper point at every corner that is not already touching another triangle
  4. Repeat step 3 until you run out of room on your paper

If you have enough paper (a single sheet of A4 is more than enough for triangles of side length 5mm), you should see something like the above starting to take shape.

If you have enough paper, you’ll notice that the pattern just keeps multiplying itself in an entirely predictable pattern, and that each subsection of the pattern looks basically the same as the overall pattern—this is what makes it a fractal.

Now go forth and Sierpinski!

*97

scishow:

ADA LOVELACE: GREAT MINDS

Ada Lovelace, daughter of Lord Byron, the “Enchantress of Numbers,” is considered to be the first author of a computer program…even though she lived more than a century before the first modern computer.

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The Retro-Proto-Turbo-Encabulator is finally here!

The world has been waiting for this for a very long time!

(Source: youtube.com)

dendodge:

ohyousillypotato:

thatwasadubstep:

tastefullyoffensive:

How to Eat Chocolate Indefinitely (gif version)

what

ive been sitting here for twenty fuckin minutes trying to figure out just what the hell is going on here and i can’t

If you look carefully, the diagonal line isn’t straight, but it’s treated as if it were straight when the pieces are swapped around, so a gap is being spontaneously filled by the gif—that gap has the same area as the extra chunk (but a different shape).
It’s a relatively famous illusiony thing, but I can’t remember if it has a name.

Maths—ruining everyone’s fun since forever.

dendodge:

ohyousillypotato:

thatwasadubstep:

tastefullyoffensive:

How to Eat Chocolate Indefinitely (gif version)

what

ive been sitting here for twenty fuckin minutes trying to figure out just what the hell is going on here and i can’t

If you look carefully, the diagonal line isn’t straight, but it’s treated as if it were straight when the pieces are swapped around, so a gap is being spontaneously filled by the gif—that gap has the same area as the extra chunk (but a different shape).

It’s a relatively famous illusiony thing, but I can’t remember if it has a name.

Maths—ruining everyone’s fun since forever.

(Source: togifs, via clara-always-knows)

scienceyoucanlove:

Pictured below are three crater lakes on the island of Flores, Indonesia, famous for their distinct varying colors. In addition to the clear difference in color, the lake colors commonly change.These lakes are named Tiwu Nuwa Muri Koo Fai, Tiwu Ata Polo, and Tiwu Ata Mbupu by the local people of the Kelimutu area (named left to right). Translated to English, these lakes are called the Lake of Young Men and Maidens, Enchanted Lake, and Lake of Old People (English translations, left to right). These crater-formed bodies of water have deep roots in Indonesian history. Indigenous peoples believe that the lakes are the resting places of their ancestors, and the varying colors of the lakes are due to changing moods of these spirits.
read more here

scienceyoucanlove:

Pictured below are three crater lakes on the island of Flores, Indonesia, famous for their distinct varying colors. In addition to the clear difference in color, the lake colors commonly change.

These lakes are named Tiwu Nuwa Muri Koo Fai, Tiwu Ata Polo, and Tiwu Ata Mbupu by the local people of the Kelimutu area (named left to right). Translated to English, these lakes are called the Lake of Young Men and Maidens, Enchanted Lake, and Lake of Old People (English translations, left to right). These crater-formed bodies of water have deep roots in Indonesian history. Indigenous peoples believe that the lakes are the resting places of their ancestors, and the varying colors of the lakes are due to changing moods of these spirits.

read more here

jtotheizzoe:

I hate waking up to bad news.

Thanks to Congress and the White House failing to agree on budget cuts, and the subsequent “sequestration” (across-the-board, slash-and-burn, top-to-bottom money-trimming), NASA has announced that they are suspending all education and public outreach activities. It’s a suspension, not a cancellation … but uggghhhh.

NASA knows this sucks. But they’ve been put in a place where they have to choose whether they can support their actual missions with the money they have been given, and no matter how much they value the extras (and they do), it’s rock-and-a-hard-place time for space folks. It’s hard to put presents under the tree if you’re struggling to keep the lights on.

Projects like the Mars Curiosity Twitter account and NASA’s Twitter socials will continue. So what could we be saying goodbye to? These are the outreach programs that put Mars science in underprivileged classrooms, turning science into smiles. The programs that publish free ebooks of our Earth as art, erasing borders and instilling wonder in one fell swoop. Programs that allow us to travel beyond our planet in a single click.

Today, online, there are so many wonderful places that can take up the slack (blogs and websites like this). But will we be able to do this effectively if NASA can’t even do it themselves? I don’t know. But we will try.

Because if we do try, then we can remind people who vote and people who make budgets of what NASA already knows: Whenever we look up, we are inspired to make new things possible, in sciences terrestrial and astronomical. And when we look back down at Earth, and those borders disappear, doesn’t it make you want to make this chart a little more even?

More coverage at Universe Today. 

This sucks, guys.

NASA’s education and outreach programs were totally awesome, and helped to show a heck of a lot of people just how fun science really is.